Best New Releases On Peacock TV 

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Peacock, NBC Universal’s streaming service, has staked a lot of its reputation on becoming the new home of The Office, to the point that the program is accounted for in the pricing tiers. However, they would be completely within their rights to promote their films as well. Peacock’s offers are based on the Universal Pictures catalog for more popular tastes, as well as a smaller selection from their arthouse label Focus Features. Outside of their own corporate umbrella, the streamer also broadcasts a wide range of box office successes and under-the-radar independent films. The best part? Everything is completely free, with only a few minor advertisements (but the Premium version offers considerably more value).

But where do you start looking for the ideal movie for your next watching on the platform? Decider is here to add a feather to your cap by sifting through all of Peacock’s cinema offerings and presenting 50 good suggestions for a variety of moods and tastes. Instead of visiting Dunder-Scranton Mifflin’s branch for the umpteenth time, let these outstanding works of film transport and alter you. Peacock has you covered whether you’re looking for a ’80s or ’90s classic, a contemporary indie success, or a low-budget treasure.

The Little Rascle 

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What Penelope Spheeris does with her big-screen adaptation of The Little Rascals is particularly joyful. It’s a narrative about little boys and girls who are amusingly ensconced in rigid beliefs of gender separation, with what appears to be childish comedy… at least based on how it makes young audiences laugh. The film’s humorous stylings, however, conceal a surprising amount of diversity and intelligence. You’ll find something far more than lowest common denominator food whether you’re blossoming into what lurks under the surface of this family staple or finding it for the first time.

They Live 

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You’ve likely seen the memes of the guy who removes his specs to view aliens and has the word “OBEY” scrawled all over him. It’s time to see John Carpenter’s sci-fi masterpiece. They Live to fully comprehend the meaning and context. This is a rare politically charged picture to come from Reagan-era Hollywood, and the film’s focus on how subliminal messages create uniformity contributes to the film’s rarity.

Johnson Family Vacation

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Sure, it’s a clear and unoriginal parody of Chevy Chase’s renowned Vacation series. But don’t let the low Rotten Tomatoes score fool you: Johnson Family Vacation is a lot of fun as Cedric the Entertainer’s Nate Johnson tries to bring his family across the country for a family reunion. I’m not sure how, but years of repeated viewing on television have made it a household phrase in my family. Everyone has their own personal vices!

Chicken Run 

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Its a stop-motion picture about hens leaving a poultry farm the finest jail escape movie? Despite not writing the rules, Chicken Run is a clever spoof of genre classics as well as a fun adventure in and of itself. The inventiveness of these hens attempting to physically fly the coop comes close to matching that of the claymation animators who painstakingly created every frame of the film.

Winter’s Bone

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See how J-Law got her start in the Sundance hit Winter’s Bone, which earned her an Oscar nomination for Best Actress at the age of 20. On the quest for her father in meth-addled Missouri, Lawrence’s Ree receives a load of misery and despair, demonstrating that self-actualization is for the affluent class. It’s an early showcase of Jennifer Lawrence’s seamless realism — the first of many to come, but not in the least tainted by what was to come later in her career.

Putney Swope 

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You may be familiar with Jr., but what about his father? In his own way, Robert Downey Sr. was a groundbreaking artist at the vanguard of culture. It was, after all, the counterculture. Start with Putney Swope if you want to get a taste of his radical work, which represented the chaotic spirit of the 1960s. The single Black member of an advertising firm’s board of directors becomes its chairman, and the satire spirals outward from there. The film’s refusal to draw punches half a century later makes it feel as current as ever.

Starred Up 

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In 2014, the media predicted that Jack O’Connell will be Hollywood’s next great star. Unfortunately, they all rallied around the incorrect film (Angelina Jolie’s Unbroken) and ignored the one that best showcases his abilities. The incorrigible O’Connell harnesses all the fury of a caged bull as he progresses from juvenile imprisonment to an adult jail in the prison thriller Starred Up. His entrance unsettles and overturns the existing order in exciting and surprising ways, despite the fact that he is the youngest person trapped within the walls.

 Glassland 

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Given that it stars Jack Reynor, Toni Collete, and Will Poulter, fans of Ari Aster’s Hereditary and Midsommer may wonder if the filmmaker cast his first two movies largely from this Irish picture. The setting for Glassland is possibly the most well-known horror story of all: addiction. John, Reynor’s teenage cab driver, only wants to help his alcoholic mother, but his efforts to do so take him down some shady paths. Gerard Barrett’s feature has an open-hearted tone about it that makes some difficult subject matter bearable.

The House Of Devil 

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Many individuals strive to vibrate on the same wavelength as director Ti West — that is, they wish to harken back to old style while preserving a uniquely current edge. Few, though, can achieve what he does in The House of the Devil, which is to recreate the atmosphere of 1980s horror without pandering to his audience. This narrative about a bad babysitting job overlaps with the slasher film and the haunted home film without making you feel like you’ve seen it a hundred times before.

Milk 

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Biopics about inspiring political figures are plentiful these days, but Gus Van Sant’s Milk stands out among a sea of mediocrity. Certainly, the work of America’s first out homosexual politician, Harvey Milk, as depicted on screen by Sean Penn to Oscar-winning effect, is unique and transformational. However, the film never loses track of the reality that Milk’s achievement was not achieved in a vacuum; he achieved what he did by engaging and inspiring a community. If Harvey Milk qualifies for a “great man” film, it’s only because he collaborated with a group of activists dedicated to utilising government power for good.

A Guide To Recognizing your Saint 

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Adapting your own biography for your directorial debut may sound like a recipe for overindulgence, but Dito Montiel pulls it off with A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints. The video depicts his childhood growing up on the rough streets of Astoria in 1986 with tenderness and sadness. He admits how the area affected his life while also driving him to seek a new one elsewhere. Phenomenal performances abound, but the true highlight is a young Channing Tatum as Dito’s turbulent pal Antonio, who provides a brutally muscular performance.

 Dark River 

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British director Clio Barnard channels a grounded earthiness in her work like few other filmmakers can, and her 2018 feature Dark River is no exception. This psychological and pastoral drama features a powerful Ruth Wilson as a sheep shearer who must deal with the unresolved pain of her past upon inheriting her father’s farm. Barnard plunges us into piercing flashbacks that underscore the trauma triggered by Wilson’s Alice fighting her brother tooth-and-nail for the tenancy of the property. These 89 minutes feel like they contain the full lifetime of a character.

The Nutty Professor 

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What could be greater than one Eddie Murphy performance in a film? How about seven Eddie Murphy performances in one film? The iconic comic plays the cheery and big scientist Sherman Klump, a good-natured man who is self-conscious about his weight while courting Jada Pinkett Smith’s attractive Carla in The Nutty Professor. He consumes an experimental elixir, which changes him into the much skinnier – but also more haughty – Buddy Love, and havoc follows. Murphy also appears in several of the film’s most iconic sequences as Sherman’s animated family members, the Klumps.

Good Hair 

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What began as Chris Rock trying to show his young girls that their hair was lovely morphed into Good Hair, a documentary that delves into the complicated standards of style and beauty for Black women in America. It’s inquisitive, informed, and always charming as Rock arrives at a lovely homage to Black hair

Meet The Patels 

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The concept of arranged marriage may sound like something out of a fantasy film, yet it is very much a part of the documentary Meet the Patels. Ravi Patel records the love journey that occurs as he grants his traditional Indian parents’ desire to examine the notion, with the assistance of his sister Geeta. An affecting, controversial, and ultimately heartwarming reflection on marriage and love.