Best HBO Max Thriller Series

best-hbo-max-thriller-series

This list of best crime, drama and thriller shows on HBO Max has some of some of the old classic titles like Boardwalk Empire but also new favorites such as Perry Mason.

The Wire

In the city of Baltimore, there are good boys and bad guys. Sometimes you need more than a badge to separate them. This series of realistic and immutable drama tells of crime, law, politics, education and the media in Baltimore as it follows a team of police and criminals who follow them.

IMDb: 9.3/10

Rotten Tomatoes: 94%

Created by: David Simon

Warrior

Suspended during the brutal Tong Wars of San Francisco’s Chinatown in the second half of the 19th century, this vicious, action-packed series follows Ah Sahm, a military champion who traveled from China to San Francisco under mysterious circumstances and became a wise man. one of the strongest characters in Chinatown (a Chinese organized crime family).

8.4/10IMDb

Warrior scored 8.4 out of 10 on IMDb.

89%Rotten Tomatoes

Created by: Jonathan Tropper

The Staircase

The year of the actual crime cases is converted into written miniseries, so Staircase fits well among others. Colin Firth, one of the most impressive plays of this year so far, plays the role of author Michael Peterson, who was convicted of killing his wife in 2001 after claiming she had fallen from a ladder. Notable actors include Toni Collette, Parker Posey, Sophie Turner, and Michael Stuhlbarg. Before you say, “Well, I’ve seen the documentary, I don’t need to see this,” know that this habit adds enough to make it interesting, including making a documentary.

We Own This City

As the founder of the HBO seminar The Wire, David Simon is the master of crime dramas. Simon returns to the Baltimore streets in We Own This City, based on a book by Baltimore Sun reporter Justin Fenton about the rise and fall of the Baltimore Police Department’s Gun Trace Task Force, which was constantly corrupt and insisted on arrests – legal or not. – over the actual work of the police. Jon Bernthal and Josh Charles are as good as dirty cops, and Simon’s good communication with everyone involved – good cops, bad cops, politicians, lawyers – is as good as The Wire to the best of your ability.

Under the Banner of Heaven

Based on a 2003 book with the same name, FX miniseries (broadcast on Hulu) follows the detective (Andrew Garfield) investigating the murder of his wife (Daisy Edgar-Jones) and his young child in Utah in the 1980s, possibly by his Mormon in-laws. which believes in the foundation. The series also explores the origins of Mormon religion, challenging the notion of blind faith and religious extremism. Narrated by the inquest into his death and the events that took place before his assassination, this moody artist is very successful in locking viewers into a story where everyone is a suspect.

Shining Girls

The mystery of the murder of his wife Elisabeth Moss is starring in this twisted Apple TV + crime game. Kirby (Moss), a survivor of a series of assassins (Jamie Bell), hunts down a criminal in the 1990s in Chicago with the help of a colleague (Narcos’ Wagner Moura) in the Chicago Sun-Times. There is only one thing he keeps to himself: You go through different realities where details can change, but the killer is still hunting for more victims. For criminals who also want to dip their toes in mysterious science fiction. 

Mare of Easttown

Looking up, Maret of Easttown looks like any other criminal show about an abusive police officer solving a case. The series follows Titular Mare (Kate Winslet, who presents one of the best plays of her career), a Pennsylvania detective, as she investigates the murder of a local girl while at the same time dealing with her deep-seated abuse. But no matter how many black murder dramas are available, Mare is special: It’s an exciting mystery; it is a study of the character of the injured; it is, occasionally, the sitcom of the mother’s daughter. Mare is a showcase for a group of outstanding actors – not just Winslet, but also Evan Peters as Mare’s partner, Jean Smart as his mother, and Julianne Nicholson as his best friend, all doing their best for Delco. It is an example of how to build a successful world, how to make a small TV town feel like a real small town. An app that gave us Jean Smart to play Fruit Ninja on iPad. There were a few weeks when Mare was the only thing I and everyone I knew could talk about – probably the closest thing to a quote-unquote watercooler show we had in a long time. It is a series that is so cleverly designed that even if it is missed, it does not matter; this has recently become another detail that should be unraveled. Long after the end, I was still thinking about the last shot of the program.

Top of the Lake

Jane Campion’s 2013 crime drama titled Top of the Lake (Season Two, Top of the Lake: China Girl, released in 2017) is not just a wonderful mystery driven, in part, by Elisabeth’s best drama Moss, and is one of the best TV series we’ve ever seen. Installed and recorded around New Zealand, the six-part series also makes good use of its location as it follows Moss’ Robin Griffin, a Sydney-based detective and child protection expert, who returns to his hometown of New Zealand after him. my mother is sick. While there, she begins investigating the disappearance of a 12-year-old pregnant girl in a remote lake town, a case that opens old wounds and leads to a thrilling and thought-provoking story about surviving a world dominated by immorality among women.

Ragdoll

This British psychiatric thriller is something like a very subtle Lamb Peace, a dark sense of humor. Next comes Nathan Rose (Henry Lloyd-Hughes), a London-based detective who has a bad reputation, as he tries to apprehend “Ragdoll Killer,” a murderous killer when a crime scene involves a sculpture made of six human bodies linked together with a murder. a list of his next six goals, including Nathan Rose himself. His co-worker Emily Baxter (Thalissa Teixeira) and an American police officer in London named Lake Edmunds (Lucy Hale, away from Pretty Little Liars). A clever riff on a deadly story that plays with genre rules while still following it with love.